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Shi'Ksut
—  City  —
Shi'Ksut
Shi'Ksut Star City
Nation Shi'Ji
First Settlement 2105 BC
Government
 - Chief Tnuk'Ikri (Strong Eagle)
 - Shaman
Elevation 165 m (540 ft)
Population (1800 BC)
 - Total 43,000
 - Demonym Shi'Jian


Shi'Ksut is the largest settled city of the Shi'Ji. It is built along the Great Spirit River and contains 43,000 citizens. Shi'Ksut is built of stone and wooden structures and has several projects to enlarge the city underway.

Infrastructure[]

The largest structure is the Tkusin'Shi'Ji, a stone and dirt pyramid one hundred feet tall, a religious temple for the Star People who come to visit the Shi'Ji every one hundred years. The top of the pyramid is round, nearly 150 feet in diameter. Markings are burned into the ground at the top, marking symbols of the stars, constellations and symbols representing the Star People. Other temple pyramids are being built, which when completed, will rise far taller. These are also made of stone.

Shi'Stsu'Mksi[]

The Star Spirit Grounds are large holy symbols and markings burned into the ground that are found to the northeast, north west and south of the city. Each symbol is circular and are over 500 feet wide. Each symbol represents the Star People, the Spirit People and the Great Spirit itself. Other smaller ground burnings are found around the city, which are all holy sites, each representing an elemental spirit. Each symbol is up to 100 feet in diameter. Certain elemental ground symbols are used for certain ceremonies. The Love Spirit symbol is used during marriages for example.

Shi'Ksutsi[]

The Shi'Ksutsi are small villages found along the Spirit River Valley that precede the existence of Shi'Ksut. Shi'Ksutsi means Star Villages. Most are small communities of less than several hundred people each. These communities are not part of Shi'Ksut but are part of the Shi'Ji nation, under the control of the Chief of the Shi'Ji. Shi'Ksutsi villages fish in the river as well as maintain small farms for maize and other vegetables. Hunter-gatherer tribes also visit these villages to trade.

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